4 Telling Signs Your Business is Ready for the Cloud

Posted by Mark Jennings - November 06, 2013 - SymQuest Blog, Cloud Computing

blog_cloud_computing_small_medium_business

You've heard all the hype about how cloud computing is changing IT for businesses, but you never thought it was something you needed to consider for your business. After all, you own your own equipment, back up your data regularly and even have an IT rep. But everything you thought was in your favor could actually be causing you more problems. Here are four telling signs that your business is ready to move to the cloud.

  1. Your Equipment is Out of Date. If you maintain your server and other hardware on your own, chances are it's not as current as it could be. Upgrading is expensive, and it really should be done every couple of years, but it might not be in your budget. When you shift to the cloud, the need to upgrade your equipment disappears—your cloud provider will always be up to date.
  2. You're Still Using Tape Backup. Your data is vital to running your business, and you might think you have it all safely saved, but there are a lot of disadvantages to tape backup. Tapes can be lost, broken, or stolen. They might not be easily read by today's machines if they're old enough. And you might be paying for more storage space than you actually need. The cloud allows users to pay for space as they need it, and not only does your disaster recovery time decrease, your data is much easier to access.
  3. Your Productivity is Low. When you spend time dealing with mundane IT tasks and day-to-day administration, you're taking away time that you could be spending on the real challenges of your business. The cloud allows you to implement applications faster and simplifies the process of updating your network, so you can focus on what you really care about.
  4. Your IT Costs are Unpredictable. Having a reliable network costs money. You need to shell out for equipment and applications, and you need to pay to install and house everything. Plus there's the cost of a human being to help you when things go wrong, and if disaster strikes, that's even more money to fix it. Most cloud providers have plans in place that allow you to have access to a range of services and know exactly what you're paying for each month.

about the author

Mark Jennings

Mark Jennings is SymQuest’s Area Vice President of IT Sales. Jennings works with SymQuest’s sales and service teams to educate customers on current best practices around data protection, disaster recovery, security, and overall technology planning.

Mark Jennings
LinkedIn

Comments